Yamaha v Aulos keyed tenor

Home Forum Recorder Makes, Models and Maintenance Yamaha v Aulos keyed tenor

This topic contains 20 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Pavane May 20, 2020 at 1:18 pm.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 21 total)
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  • #760

    Aulos303
    Participant

    I had an Aulos tenor a while ago but it had no keys and I found it a stretch (Aulos 211 Robin). However they also make a keyed tenor, the 511B, and also Yamaha produce one for around the same price. But which do people prefer? And at the budget end is the Thomann tenor worth getting? Its very cheap.

    • This topic was modified 1 year, 8 months ago by  Aulos303.

    You don't stop playing when you get old. You get old when you stop playing.

    #762

    Anonymous

    I own both the Aulos keyed tenor and the Yamaha. I prefer the sound of the Yamaha – I find it richer – but I play the Aulos more as I find it less of a stretch. The holes seem the same distance apart on both models. The only difference I can see that would explathis is that the plastic key on the Aulos is a bit longer so your little finger has less of a stretch. This tiny detail makes a big difference to me. Regarding the Thomann tenor, I bought one of these first. It sounded fine but the finish was very poor. It had rough plastic seams, it was scratched and the key screws were damaged. I sent it back and bought the Yamaha. You get what you pay for. I hope this helps.

    #763

    Aulos303
    Participant

    I own both the Aulos keyed tenor and the Yamaha. I prefer the sound of the Yamaha – I find it richer – but I play the Aulos more as I find it less of a stretch. The holes seem the same distance apart on both models. The only difference I can see that would explathis is that the plastic key on the Aulos is a bit longer so your little finger has less of a stretch. This tiny detail makes a big difference to me. Regarding the Thomann tenor, I bought one of these first. It sounded fine but the finish was very poor. It had rough plastic seams, it was scratched and the key screws were damaged. I sent it back and bought the Yamaha. You get what you pay for. I hope this helps.

    Thanks, it does indeed!
    I think I would go for the Aulos as being able to play comfortably is important. I have a low D whistle which sits in the tenor range but the lowest hole is just too much of a stretch.

    You don't stop playing when you get old. You get old when you stop playing.

    #844

    Pavane
    Participant

    I was about to post a question about this but you have more-or-less answered it. That was a while ago so not sure you will even see this, but in case you do:

    Just how similar is the hole spacing between the Yamaha and the Aulos? If you look at Lazar’s tenor finger spacing chart (http://www.lazarsearlymusic.com/finger_hole_distances.htm) the plastic Yamaha has almost the worst spacing there is. Lazar’s list isn’t very comprehensive but the 4-5 gap between the Yamaha and, say, the popular Moeck Rotty, is substantially bigger at 47/37mm.

    I have the Aulos Robin tenor and the spacing is much easier on that, though I find the lower notes overblow very easily. I also have the Yamaha which is much better in terms of quality, but I would get the Aulos Symphony as well if the spacing was better than on the Yamaha. I don’t find the stretch to the keys on the Yamaha a problem so no point buying the Aulos if that’s the only gain.

    #845

    Aulos303
    Participant

    I was about to post a question about this but you have more-or-less answered it. That was a while ago so not sure you will even see this, but in case you do:

    Just how similar is the hole spacing between the Yamaha and the Aulos? .

    I have the Aulos Robin tenor and the spacing is much easier on that, though I find the lower notes overblow very easily.

    I now have the Aulos robin tenor (211A). It is easy to finger as the holes are drilled at angle so are closer together at the surface.

    • This reply was modified 1 year ago by  Aulos303.

    You don't stop playing when you get old. You get old when you stop playing.

    #849

    Pavane
    Participant

    I now have the Aulos robin tenor (211A). It is easy to finger

    Easier than the Yamaha or the Aulos Symphony? I agree that the Robin is quite easy to finger but I don’t actually like it all that much.

    #850

    Aulos303
    Participant

    Oh I like it a lot. I can’t say about the other tenors as the 211 is the only tenor I’ve played.

    You don't stop playing when you get old. You get old when you stop playing.

    #887

    L’Arlésienne
    Participant

    Hello! I have a very similar question. I play soprano recorder and want to start on my first tenor recorder.
    I have small hands (to give an example, I can reach no more than an octave on the piano) but am avoiding the Robin as I want to learn on a keyed tenor and not grow accustomed to an unconventional model in case I upgrade to a professional tenor, take lessons, join a group, and so on.
    Would you most recommend the Yamaha, regular Aulos, or Harmony (West Music) for the best reach? Thanks!

    • This reply was modified 11 months, 2 weeks ago by  L'Arlésienne.
    #889

    Aulos303
    Participant

    Hello! I have a very similar question. I play soprano recorder and want to start on my first tenor recorder.
    I have small hands (to give an example, I can reach no more than an octave on the piano) but am avoiding the Robin as I want to learn on a keyed tenor and not grow accustomed to an unconventional model in case I upgrade to a professional tenor, take lessons, join a group, and so on.
    Would you most recommend the Yamaha, regular Aulos, or Harmony (West Music) for the best reach? Thanks!

    I can’t really say because I have only ever played one tenor-the Aulos Robin, so I have no idea how a keyed tenor compares. Be aware though that some tenors lack the C# key-they only have one key. Best to make sure the one you get has 2 bottom keys.

    • This reply was modified 11 months, 2 weeks ago by  Aulos303.

    You don't stop playing when you get old. You get old when you stop playing.

    #891

    L’Arlésienne
    Participant

    Hello! I have a very similar question. I play soprano recorder and want to start on my first tenor recorder.
    I have small hands (to give an example, I can reach no more than an octave on the piano) but am avoiding the Robin as I want to learn on a keyed tenor and not grow accustomed to an unconventional model in case I upgrade to a professional tenor, take lessons, join a group, and so on.
    Would you most recommend the Yamaha, regular Aulos, or Harmony (West Music) for the best reach? Thanks!

    I can’t really say because I have only ever played one tenor-the Aulos Robin, so I have no idea how a keyed tenor compares. Be aware though that some tenors lack the C# key-they only have one key. Best to make sure the one you get has 2 bottom keys.

    Thanks for the reminder! The standard Aulos says “Double keys for low C and C#”, so I think it’s good.

    #892

    Pavane
    Participant

    The standard Aulos says “Double keys for low C and C#”, so I think it’s good.

    The two “serious contenders” in the plastic tenor world are the Aulos Symphony and the Yamaha, and both have low C# so that is not really an issue. I think it’s worth remembering that, until recently, most recorders were (more or less) copies of surviving baroque and pre-baroque instruments (Moeck Rottenburgh, Mollenhauer Denner, etc), and almost all of those did not have low C#. Probably for that reason, the note virtually never appears in pre-twentieth century music. Even if it does, you can substitute low E in most cases.

    The total reach on the plastic Yamaha and the Aulos Robin are almost identical – I have both in front of me now. The left hand hole spacing is virtually identical. The holes are a bit closer together on the Robin for the right hand, but there is no key so you have to directly finger all of them; the distance from hole 4 to hole 7 (Robin) or keys (Yamaha) is also pretty much the same. I think the choice boils down to whether you prefer to use the keys or not, and which sound you like the most. The Yamaha is a good quality instrument but I personally find it too bright. An advantage of not having keys is that there is nothing to go wrong. Not having keys is certainly not unconventional, and neither is having a single key and no low C#. It really does come down to whichever you like the most.

    #893

    Aulos303
    Participant

    The thing with the Robin tenor is the holes appear closer together than a keyed tenor, but that’s only at the surface due to a bit of clever manipulation. The holes are drilled at an angle, so are like / and \ rather than | thus allowing for a shorter instrument for smaller hands. Still a bit of a stretch even for my piano fingers, but it works well.

    You don't stop playing when you get old. You get old when you stop playing.

    #894

    L’Arlésienne
    Participant

    Thanks again! I’d prefer a softer sound to a brighter one as I want to play Baroque and Renaissance. I think I will pick the Aulos Symphony and wait until a music store has a sale since it’s the most expensive of the three.

    #895

    Pavane
    Participant

    Good luck and maybe post-Christmas sales will give you an opportunity to get the Aulos. If it does, please post your thoughts on the sound, I would still like to know!

    Incidentally, an advantage of the keyed models tends to be that you can play high C# without having to use your knee to block the end, which is probably more useful than being able to get low C#. The more-or-less regular Ø1-345-7 apparently works on the Symphony.

    #896

    L’Arlésienne
    Participant

    Thanks! 🙂 I’m hoping for sales too! I’ll definitely post if I can get one!
    Oh awesome, thanks for letting me know!

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