Problems with Tenor Recorder

Recorder Forum Home Page Forum Teaching and Learning Problems with Tenor Recorder

Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
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  • #1473
    Alan Beckham
    Participant

    Hi. Im new to the Tenor Recorder and Im having difficulties sounding the lower notes (below G). Am I not covering the holes properly or blowing too hard/ too softly? Any guidance would be much appreciated.

    Thank you

    Alan

    #1475
    Dick Mattson
    Participant

    Cover the RH holes with tape and then try blowing. If the problem goes away, then you aren’t covering the holes properly. If the problem doesn’t go away, try blowing differently. If the problem does go away, then you have learned how to blow the lower notes. If the problem never goes away, then the problem might be with the instrument and you should get it professionally checked out. BTW, what kind of recorder is it?

    #1476
    Alan Beckham
    Participant

    Hi. Thanks for your comments.

    Its a Yamaha 304BII

    #1477
    Dick Mattson
    Participant

    Were you able to figure it out?

    #1478
    Alan Beckham
    Participant

    Im sure it is my right hand fingering that is the problem. I will just have to keep working at it!

    #1482
    Ken In Dallas
    Participant

    Hey There… I’ve resolved Tenor issues for myself and students by sitting forward on the chair, using a chair that has no arm rests so that the arms can find their neutral hanging position, and by placing a thumb rest so that the right-hand pinky approaches its holes perfectly perpendicular to the instrument. For most, this means the rest will often place the right thumb exactly opposite the right middle-finger when holding the instrument. The resulting sharper bend now in the wrist hasn’t caused anyone any pain here to date.

    Once the problem is considered resolved with a plastic rest, a wood or cork rest can be glued there to create that same hand position. I mention gluing the rest as you may find the plastic one will slide upward from pressure on the thumb rest to get that hand low enough down the instrument to position the pinky. — k —

    #1483
    Alan Beckham
    Participant

    Thanks Ken. I have moved the plastic rest as you suggested and my right hand fingering is much better!

    Cheers

    #1869
    Stephen Collier
    Participant

    May I add a related question? I have problem with these lower notes on a tenor, too. I will try the above suggestion. I wondered if it is acceptable to use a piper’s grip for the right hand?

    I have a childhood injury that means I can’t bend the top joint of my right index finger. It is OK for soprano, but it is almost impossible for the tenor. If I use a RH piper’s grip (tin whistle style) I can get to D quite well, though I have to be very accurate. Is it acceptable to play this way? If I start taking grades, will I be penalized or fail for bad style? Will I have to unlearn this later, when things get more chromatic? Thanks for any thoughts. First post.

    #1870
    Ken In Dallas
    Participant

    Purely opinion: If you have a finger issue, any work-around that still permits a clean note and fluid note changing is “Kosher.” Trumping that might be an in-person evaluation by an Occupational Therapist. Make sense?

    #1871
    Stephen Collier
    Participant

    Thank you for the answer. I will try the piper’s grip for a while and see how it goes. As a plan B I have ordered a low D tin whistle – similar in size to a tenor recorder 🙂 – so at least it will be the same grip in both, for now.

    #1872
    Jacqui
    Participant

    By “piper’s grip” do you mean covering the tone holes with part of the finger closer to the hand than the pad? You can definitely do this. Here’s an example.

    And if “start taking grades” refers to the UK grade exams, it’s fine. They don’t mark on specific points of technique, only musical outcome.

    Descant and treble recorders.
    https://www.instrumentalists.freeforums.net

    #1873
    Stephen Collier
    Participant

    Thanks, Jacqui. Yes, I did mean that. Thanks for the example video. He’s playing with a piper’s grip in both hands. I have memories of being told off as a child for playing a piano like that 🙂 so I thought I had better ask. I’m glad to hear that UK exams would be OK with this.

    #1874
    Jacqui
    Participant

    It is possible to buy recorders with keys for one-handed use and also recorders where you can twist all the holes around individually (the way you can twist the foot joint on any three-piece recorder) to get all of the holes in good places for you. It is also possible for instrument makers/repairers to add custom keys to any existing instrument. For example you could add a key so that you could use your left little finger to do the work of your right index finger. (Although I have no idea how hard it might be to play that way.)

    If you want links I can search some out.

    • This reply was modified 9 months ago by Jacqui.

    Descant and treble recorders.
    https://www.instrumentalists.freeforums.net

    #1876
    Stephen Collier
    Participant

    Thanks for the info! So far, I’m making progress allowing myself the piper’s grip in the right hand, but it’s good to know of these options.

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