Yamaha Ecodear models

Home Forum Recorder Makes, Models and Maintenance Yamaha Ecodear models

This topic contains 10 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Richard Hureau November 9, 2020 at 6:08 pm.

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  • #1212

    Richard Hureau
    Participant

    There has been a lot of confusion about the TWO Yamaha Ecodear alto models available in other countries (especially UK), while only one model is available in the USA (the 402B). The one that is not for sale (usually) in the USA is the 48B. I have a complete write-up on this, here:
    http://www.rahsoft.net/ecodear.htm

    Enjoy! I bought the 48B on Ebay at Quinn the Eskimo store NEW for only $19.99 and $6 shipping – https://www.ebay.com/usr/quinntheeskimo?_trksid=p2047675.l2559

    #1214

    Ken In Dallas
    Participant

    I’ve got an Alto Yamaha, Aulos, and Zen On in addition to my wonderful wooden Mollenhauer. One mouth; Two hands. They need to raise the prices on plastic recorders to keep us from hurting ourselves. Nice find. Well done! — k

    #1215

    Richard Hureau
    Participant

    I agree that one tends to accumulate a bunch of plastic recorders. I pretty much buy any high-quality plastic recorder that any major manufacturer comes out with. I am resisting all the cheaper knock-offs that seem to be coming out of China these days; some may be OK, I suppose. The Triebert gets good reviews on Amazon; I won’t spring for it, however, because, as you say, not enough fingers for so many recorders. I’ve also resisted the expensive Zen-on 415 model because I have no use for it (plus, I don’t much like the 440 Zen-on G-1A). I’m glad it’s available, however, for folks who want a relatively inexpensive 415.

    I usually wind up having most sitting in a drawer, never used again (like the Yamaha 302B and the 402B), especially since I got my Bernolin resin. But I’m pretty sure you agree that we should celebrate the fact that you can get such high-quality instruments at such low prices. I cannot think of another instrument in this category (maybe harmonicas?).

    #1218

    Ken In Dallas
    Participant

    Richard, Jumping off from what’s above, I discovered your trill page. Wow. What a work! Thank you.

    http://www.rahsoft.net/

    One question: Much music has a “+” above the staff that I’ve always thought to be a trill indication, yet you don’t mention that symbol in your exhaustive website. Have I got it wrong that it’s a trill, and (if it is a trill) is there a preferred way to play those?

    Again, thank you. — k

    #1219

    Richard Hureau
    Participant

    Richard, Jumping off from what’s above, I discovered your trill page. Wow. What a work! Thank you.

    http://www.rahsoft.net/

    One question: Much music has a “+” above the staff that I’ve always thought to be a trill indication, yet you don’t mention that symbol in your exhaustive website. Have I got it wrong that it’s a trill, and (if it is a trill) is there a preferred way to play those?

    Again, thank you. — k

    Ken, you sent me scurrying to my books! I have always thought of the + sign as meaning “do some ornamentation here” (hopefully appropriate), not necessarily a trill (which would be notated with the standard “tr”). Looking in Ken Wollitz’s book “The Recorder Book,” it says, “The tiny cross ( + ) so often seen above notes in Baroque music, whose meaning is simply to insert an ornament of whatever kind appropriate, can often suggest an appoggiatura, and the ornament can be introduced where there is no sign at all.”

    A trill is basically an appoggiatura on steroids, so sometimes editors will use the + sign instead of “tr”. I have never seen sheet music that uses BOTH (but it should be possible). I think that this is because trills are so ubiquitous that they are really the ONLY ornament that editors put into music editions, so they just pick one symbol for it and stick with it. I mean, I have never seen an edition showing a plus sign where you might want say a passing or long appoggiatura, because they just don’t notate that type of thing. The musician is just supposed to throw them in where they feel like it (and make a mess of the music!). Love it!

    Glad you like my website. I haven’t mentioned it much because one of its main features is the software I wrote called Recorder Digits (for Windows). It still works fine, but I don’t support it anymore, so I worry that people might report problems or ask for enhancements that I cannot make. For example, one of the last changes I made was because a college student (Oberlin, I think) requested that I have it display fingerings for non-standard recorders (e.g. alto in G). So I did that (at great effort), but then the programming software (Microsoft Visual C++) got too expensive to buy and I was into other things anyway. But it does still work and I use it myself.

    Of course, the rest of the website, devoted mainly to TURNED trills (and alternate fingerings for such animals) is still fine. It does also have regular trills and turns and alternate fingerings for each. Again, glad you like it! 🙂

    #1220

    Ken In Dallas
    Participant

    Walked to my stand and within a few pages found them together in measures 31- 33 of Chédeville’s “Pastorale” in Schott’s ‘Baroque Recorder Anthology 3’ ed. Bowman and Heyens.
    (looks like I’ll have to change my evil ways. No?) — k

    + & tr

    #1223

    Ken In Dallas
    Participant

    The image for the above post is attached here.

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    #1225

    Richard Hureau
    Participant

    The image for the above post is attached here.

    Ken, that’s interesting. This is the first time I have ever actually been proven correct in anything I’ve ever said! Wow! 😉

    I wish you’d cropped that example one note later. What’s the next note after the E with the plus sign? It might tell us what ornament the editor (or composer) had in mind for that spot . Clearly not a trill, now that we see both used together – yes, you need to change your evil ways! 😉

    Rich

    #1226

    Ken In Dallas
    Participant

    Here ya go, and I’m posting another example though we don’t know how many pens have touched the piece in these 200+ years. — k

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    #1229

    Richard Hureau
    Participant

    Hmm, those notes are already in step-wise sequence, so it doesn’t want an appoggiatura to fill a gap or something like that. Use a trill! 😉 I’ll have to try them tomorrow and see, but it actually does look like trills would be good for them. Gee. Well, I said ANY ornament that works! OK – how about for each of those – 3 VERY fast 5-note turns, followed by a mordent! Yes!! 😉

    #1230

    Richard Hureau
    Participant

    Here ya go, and I’m posting another example though we don’t know how many pens have touched the piece in these 200+ years. — k

    I tried those 2 examples. I’m no expert on ornamentation, but I’d say to use trills on all those + signs except the first note in the 2nd example (the f# at the beginning of the sample). You could use a 4-note turn (starts on the note above) or turned trill on it (going directly into the g; very sweet!). Phew, I rescued one, I think!

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