How to re-attach lose cork on joints

Home Forum Recorder Makes, Models and Maintenance How to re-attach lose cork on joints

This topic contains 8 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  C.R. Marshall December 29, 2019 at 1:51 am.

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
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  • #243

    recorderoz
    Participant

    My tenor has cork to seal the joints. On one end the cork is about to come loose, I’m thinking it might be best to stick it down. Is there a special glue to do this? I’m loath to use a standard wood glue.

    Mostly alto, plays with Balmain Baroque

    #244

    Dick Mattson
    Participant

    This happened to one of my older altos. Rather than trying to save the cork, I carefully removed all of it and then wrapped the tenon with waxed dental floss–taking care to layer the floss evenly (just like sewing thread is wrapped on a spool) and not get it too thick. Once I got the proper fit, I just clipped the end of the floss and laid it in place. The waxed floss has stayed put, has provided as good a seal as cork, and has never needed to be greased.

    #287

    Anonymous

    Hi I fix recorders,you can buy cork sheets in different thicknesses ,from music medics,and stick on with contact,it is generally used for recorking saxes,it is resistant to moisture and easy to remove,

    #290

    recorderoz
    Participant

    Thanks for that. I’ve got some loose cork on my tenor, I’ll try some contact adhesive.

    Mostly alto, plays with Balmain Baroque

    #292

    Anonymous

    Hi recorderoz, Iv,e recorked many saxes mouthpiece joints with contact, as when I first started on my own saxes I used super glue because I didn,t know any better ,and it set instantly ,and could use straight away ,but having spoke to a local pro woodwind repairer,he told me to use contact, and I,Ve used it ever since,it’s a bit messy to work with,does the job great,and is easy to remove,but if your trying to stick down a old cork without replacing it ,i,d recommend making sure it’s properly dry,and with a small tool I,d ,like a blunt tooth pick, i,d push some contact under cork,clean up any mess with some,cloth or tissue and then,wrap the join firmly,with something non sticky like a strip of shopping bag,clean up any excess glue that has oozed out and leave for at least 24hrs,regards Firepony.

    #293

    Anonymous

    Re Dick Mattson,I think generally these days people use wax polyester thread laid carefully,so wax dental floss is perfect and easy ,cause you don’t have to wax ,but if you don,t want a loose end ,you just lay a loop across the join,and bind from the loose end and then pass the working loose end through the loop ,then pull the standing loose end,so the loop pulls the working loose end under the binding threads,then snip off the excess standing loose end,regards Firepony.

    #294

    recorderoz
    Participant

    All good. Great to experts on hand!

    Mostly alto, plays with Balmain Baroque

    #302

    Anonymous

    I like to fix my recorders the way they came ie waxed string,waxed sting,cork then cork,just because I like that,regarding cork, you can buy cork sheets from music medics in packs of 10?,(around $46 )would probably last you a lifetime,you can buy the thickness you know u want ,or you can buy a mixed pack of thicknesses,which would suit all your different flutes ,and share with recorder friends,also as a QUICK fix,that is inexpensive,use instantly,easy to apply,seals well,lasts a while,get some thread sealant tape from your local hardware,you know the type?,for taps or gas fittings ,works well ,quick to apply,non sticky ,easy to remove, doesn’t, need knots,regards Firepony.

    #899

    C.R. Marshall
    Participant

    The cork came loose on my 1970’s Moeck Rotenberg. I took it to a local music store and they replaced the cork in an afternoon for $20.

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